Beating Cancer, One Tumor at a Time

Cancer Ablation | 0 comments | by IGCS

The Institute for Image Guided Cancer Treatment uses image-guided ablation therapy in conjunction with tumor vaccines and anti-cancer medication. Our treatment directly targets tumors using minimally invasive image guided technology

 

Cancer Ablation

Ablation destroys tumors using extreme temperatures. The procedure involves inserting a needle into the cancer cells using image guidance technology. Cold temperatures, called cryoablation, or hot temperatures, known as microwave and radiofrequency ablation, are transmitted through the needle, destroying cancer cells. 

Personalized Cancer Vaccine (AblationVaxTM)

A personalized cancer vaccine is generated during cancer ablation. The ablation process results in dead cancer cells within the body. An anti-cancer immune response can be generated from the immune system clearing these dead cells. Ablation alone is only weakly immune stimulating and is rarely enough to result in a significant systemic anti-cancer immune response. The immune response from ablation can be enhanced by administering a combination of immune stimulating drugs. 


For years, doctors and researchers have been concerned about a surprising trend: More and more women with early-stage cancer in one breast were choosing to have double mastectomies to reduce the risk of cancer in the other.

But new evidence released Monday shows that the surgery doesn’t improve peace of mind or quality of life very much.

Researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute surveyed thousands of women who had cancer in a single breast and underwent single and double mastectomies. They wanted to see whether the double-mastectomy patients were less anxious, more satisfied with their physical appearance and more confident in their sexuality. 

“What this shows is removing a healthy organ doesn’t improve quality of life as much as women think that it might,” said senior author Shelley Hwang, the institute’s chief of breast surgery. She said that women continued to have anxiety about cancer, regardless of which surgery they had.

But “unless a woman has a gene mutation that places her at significantly increased risk of a new cancer in the other breast, CPM (contralateral prophylactic mastectomies) doesn’t prolong life, and our study shows that it doesn’t make for a notably better quality of life,” Hwang said. “Breast surgeons as a community are very worried about women using this kind of surgery to alleviate anxiety,” she added. “Surgery is meant to cure a biological problem, not make people feel less anxious.”

Many women with cancer in one breast overestimate their risk of developing cancer in the other breast, which is actually low. Some doctors aren’t adequately explaining the risks involved, she said.

“Maybe we need to educate women better,” she said, adding that double mastectomies carry their own risks, including possible numbness across the chest wall, chronic pain and repeated infections.

The Duke study, showed that women who had CPMs tended to be younger, with higher incomes and earlier-stage disease. The study also found that having breast reconstruction was the single most important factor in a better quality of life.

Hwang stressed that the research excluded women with a much higher cancer risk due to the presence of a genetic mutation, such as BRAC1 or 2. “That’s a totally different situation,” she said.

That study found that for younger women with early-stage, non-inherited cancer in one breast, a single mastectomy leads to a slightly higher quality of life and lower costs over the two decades, compared with CPMs.

Contact your specialist. 1 844-359-4201 
www.cancerablation.com

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More women with cancer in one breast are having double mastectomies…

Cancer Ablation | 0 comments | by IGCS

More women with cancer in one breast are having double mastectomies. That might not be a good idea. For years, doctors and researchers have been concerned about a surprising trend: More and more women with early-stage cancer in one breast were choosing to have double mastectomies to reduce the risk of cancer in the other.

But new evidence released Monday shows that the surgery doesn’t improve peace of mind or quality of life very much. Researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute surveyed thousands of women who had cancer in a single breast and underwent single and double mastectomies. They wanted to see whether the double-mastectomy patients were less anxious, more satisfied with their physical appearance and more confident in their sexuality. “What this shows is removing a healthy organ doesn’t improve quality of life as much as women think that it might,” said senior author Shelley Hwang, the institute’s chief of breast surgery. She said that women continued to have anxiety about cancer, regardless of which surgery they had.

But “unless a woman has a gene mutation that places her at significantly increased risk of a new cancer in the other breast, CPM (contralateral prophylactic mastectomies) doesn’t prolong life, and our study shows that it doesn’t make for a notably better quality of life,” Hwang said. “Breast surgeons as a community are very worried about women using this kind of surgery to alleviate anxiety,” she added. “Surgery is meant to cure a biological problem, not make people feel less anxious.”

Many women with cancer in one breast overestimate their risk of developing cancer in the other breast, which is actually low. Some doctors aren’t adequately explaining the risks involved, she said. “Maybe we need to educate women better,” she said, adding that double mastectomies carry their own risks, including possible numbness across the chest wall, chronic pain and repeated infections.
The Duke study, showed that women who had CPMs tended to be younger, with higher incomes and earlier-stage disease. The study also found that having breast reconstruction was the single most important factor in a better quality of life.

Hwang stressed that the research excluded women with a much higher cancer risk due to the presence of a genetic mutation, such as BRAC1 or 2. “That’s a totally different situation,” she said. That study found that for younger women with early-stage, non-inherited cancer in one breast, a single mastectomy leads to a slightly higher quality of life and lower costs over the two decades, compared with CPMs.

Contact your specialist. 1 844-359-4201
www.cancerablation.com

read more

Adding immunotherapy to RFA may benefit…

Cancer Ablation | 0 comments | by IGCS

Adding immunotherapy to RFA may benefit colorectal cancer patients with liver metastasis.

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), a procedure to treat liver metastases in patients with colorectal cancer, was found to induce antitumor immune responses in human samples of primary colon tumor, and mice treated with a combination of RFA and an immune checkpoint inhibitor survived longer than those treated with either one of the two therapies, according to a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Continue reading —–> http://medicalxpress.com/…/2016-03-adding-immunotherapy-rfa…

Contact your specialist 1 844-359-4201
www.cancerablation.com

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Help Prevent Cancer By Taking Control of Your Diet

Cancer Ablation | 0 comments | by IGCS

Reviewed by Wendy Marcason.

Chances are your life has been touched by cancer — whether you, a parent, friend or even a child has been diagnosed. While cancer can leave us feeling helpless, the good news is that there are measures you can take to help prevent the disease. Your diet is one of the most important factors under your control. This year, an estimated over half a million Americans will lose their lives to cancer, and more than 1.68 million men and women will be diagnosed with this devastating illness. Lifestyle changes, along with early detection, can prevent nearly half of all cancer deaths.

Eating well can help you prevent and beat cancer in a variety of ways. weet this A healthy diet can lower your risk for developing cancer. And, if you have been diagnosed, eating well can positively support treatment, and help you live well for years to come after treatment. Here are some general guidelines to help reduce your cancer risk through eating right:

· Maintaining a healthy weight is key to reducing your risk of cancer and other diseases. The connection between cancer and obesity varies widely for different cancer types, but is as high as 40 percent for some cancers, particularly endometrial cancer and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

· Reduce your intake of calories from solid fats and added sugar. Foods with added sugars and fats can cause weight gain and leave little room for more healthful, cancer-preventive foods.

· Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables including beans, which are linked with a lower risk of certain cancers. Fill half your plate each meal with a variety of naturally nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables.

· Limit alcohol. Evidence suggests all types of alcoholic drinks may increase your risk of a number of cancers, including mouth, throat (pharynx), voice box (larynx), esophagus, liver, breast, colon and rectum. It’s unclear exactly how alcohol affects cancer risk. It is considered more harmful when combined with smoking. If you drink at all, limit alcoholic drinks to no more than one drink daily for women and two for men.

For more tips on reducing your risk or managing diseases through nutrition, consult a registered dietitian nutritionist in your area or visit www.eatright.org/diseasemanagement

CONTACT YOUR SPECIALIST 1 844-359-4201

www.cancerablation.com

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